Lava rafting

Lava rafting is quite literally taking an insulated raft, moulded from an ultra heat resistant ceramic, dropping it on the fresh lava flow of an erupting volcano and punting it down the flow till the lava solidifies!

Ostensively a suicidal activity, lava rafting is the latest fad amongst terminally bored dilettantes. Despite the apparent dangers, lava rafting has a very low fatality rate. However it can result in quite disfiguring burns which take considerable time to heal and require reconstructive surgery to eradicate scars. Rafters must wear an environmental body suit which helps to reflect most of the heat radiated from the lava and provides air filtered to remove potentially poisonous volcanic gases. If a rafter falls overboard, the lava is so dense that they do not actually sink but merely settle on the surface. If the heat sensors on the skin of the suit reach critical levels, an integrated grav belt immediately floats the rafter up to a safe distance. Occasionally however, globules of lava stick to the suit and burn their way through its protection before the rafter is able to strip off the suit.

The main difficulty of lava rafting is having the correct sort of volcano available and for it to erupt at the right time. Some worlds are continual sources of volcanic activity, so organisers wishing to host lava rafting parties often mount excursion trips. Some particularly deranged dilettantes have been rumoured to artificially trigger eruptions using small nuclear devices dropped into holes suitably drilled in geologically active regions. One apocryphal tale relates a noble who ordered a full scale artillery strike on a mountain to trigger a lava flow but actually started an unsuspected super-colossal eruption and was killed in the category 7 explosion.

Lava rafting

The long strange trip philbobones